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Graduate Students

Kenneth A. Blocker

Kenneth A. Blocker
Completing the requirements for Master of Science in Cognitive Aging, Georgia Institute of Technology
Bachelor's degree:
Psychology and Sociology, Florida State University, 2013
Bio:

Kenneth A. Blocker is a doctoral student in the Cognitive Aging program. His research interests include cognitive aging, technology design and acceptance, educational technology, medical human factors, and healthcare. His current work is on better understanding the various factors that influence the management strategies of older adults with hypertension who have struggled with adhering to their antihypertensive medication(s), as well as understanding how to better design social networking applications for older adults based on the preferences of current users and non-users.

404-894-8344

Amy Wing-Lam Chong

Amy Wing-Lam Chong
Completing the requirements for Master of Science in Cognitive Aging
Bachelor's degree:
B.S.Sc. Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2015
Bio:

Amy Wing-Lam Chong is pursuing a doctoral degree in Cognitive Aging. Her research interests are aging, healthcare, and decision making. Her current project is investigating age-related differences in medication risk taking, influences of a collaborative experience on individuals’ risk-taking preferences, and how those influences may be different for younger and older adults.

404-894-8344

Christina Harrington

Christina N. Harrington
Completing the requirements for Ph.D. in Industrial Design, Georgia Institute of Technology
Master's degree:
Industrial Design, North Carolina State University, 2013
Bachelor's degree:
Electrical Engineering; Minor in Industrial Design, Virginia Tech, 2009
Bio:

Christina N. Harrington is a Ph.D. student in Design at Georgia Tech. She is a graduate research assistant in the Human Factors and Aging Laboratory where her research focuses on the evaluation and development of accessible technologies and interfaces that support healthy aging, specifically the ability for older adults to successfully conduct activities that will improve their health and socialization. Her dissertation research focuses on the efficacy of device displays and interfaces in affecting health-related behavior change and the ability to increase physical activity in the older adult population.

404-894-8344

Maurita T. Harris

Maurita T. Harris
Completing the requirements for a Master’s in Community Health, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Bachelor's degree:
Psychology, North Carolina State University, 2015
Bio:

Maurita T. Harris is a graduate student working towards a Master’s in Community Health at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research interests include aging, technology design and acceptance, smart home technologies, and healthcare. Her current research focus is on healthcare technology acceptance among older adults.

217-300-5445

Sean A. McGlynn

Sean A. McGlynn
Completing the requirements for Ph.D. in Engineering Psychology
Master's degree:
Engineering Psychology, Georgia Institute of Technology, 2016
Bachelor's degree:
Double Major – Cognitive Science, Psychology; Minor – Neuroscience, University of Connecticut, 2011
Bio:

Sean A. McGlynn is a 4th year Ph.D. student in the Engineering Psychology department. His research interests include user-interface design, human-robot interaction, virtual and augmented environments, design for older adults, technology acceptance; and cognitive aging. His current research focuses on developing a psychology-based model of the experience of presence (a user’s sense of ‘being there’) in virtual environments.

404-894-8344

Tina Nie

A photo of Tina Nie.
Completing the requirements for a Ph.D. in Community Health at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
Master's degree:
Psychology, Peking University, 2015
Bachelor's degree:
Nursing, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, 2009
Bio:

Tina-Qiong Nie is a doctoral student in the Community Health program. Her research interests include technology design and acceptance, user-interface design, healthcare, and medical human factors.

Rachel E. Stuck

Rachel E. Stuck
Completing the requirements for M.S. in Engineering Psychology
Bachelor's degree:
Experimental Psychology, University of South Carolina, SC, 2015
Bachelor's degree:
Hospitality Management, University of South Carolina, SC, 2011
Bio:

Rachel E. Stuck is a graduate student in the Engineering Psychology program. Her research interests include human-robot interaction, assistive technology and robotics, aging with impairments or disabilities, healthcare, and trust. Her current research focuses on understanding trust between older adults and personal care attendants.

404-894-8344